Overview Overview Search Search Up Up
Category: Technical Papers
Page 1 of 32
Order Files by:
Default | Name | Author | Date | Hits
folder.png Technical Papers Files: 20
 
info Only registered and logged in users can download files from this category.
Files:
pdf.png 2018 - November - Szacsvay/Pillai - We're not in Kansas anymore, Toto - Rolling Stock Signalling Compatibility Assessment NEW

Paul Szacsvay

BE(Elec) MAdmin FIRSE

SNC-Lavalin Transport & Infrastructure

Kershan Pillai

BE(Elec)/BCom MIEAust

SNC-Lavalin Transport & Infrastructure

 

SUMMARY
Beginning with the introduction of chopper controlled trains in the late 1980s, the Sydney rail network has developed and applied standards for compatibility of new rolling stock with signalling train detection systems.


While the fundamentals of testing have remained unchanged, the standards applied and the amount of testing performed have grown as rolling stock evolved and new vulnerabilities were found. New approaches to project delivery and structural changes to the client organisation have added to the complexity of the testing and approval process



Size 5.76 MB
pdf.png 2018 - November - Shead - SAFETY AND RELIABILITY IN SIGNALLING SYSTEMS NEW

JOSEPH SHEAD

Incorporated Engineer, MIRSE                     

Ansaldo STS A Hitachi Group Company
 
SUMMARY

Major projects today request high performance criteria for Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Safety of Signalling Systems often referring to be compliant with Standard EN 50126/9. Considering that, it would be an extensive task to condense the standard into this paper, which will concentrate on the Safety aspects and the Reliability of Signalling systems. Safety in itself we can expand in a number of ways take for instance the title of RAMS, this is frequently extended to RAMSS, which includes the aspect of Security and these security features will be discussed. Reliability on the other hand goes hand in hand with Availability but namely addresses the issue of probability.



Size 536.2 KB
pdf.png 2018 - November - Senesi/Nardi/Filippini/Trivedi - Advanced Signalling Systems for High Density Applications NEW

Fabio Senesi

M.Sc., PhD, MBA

Rete Ferroviaria Italiana S.p.A

Federico Nardi

BCompE (Hons), RE(OIGenova), RPEQ (Elec), MIRSE

Ansaldo STS Australia Pty Ltd

Nazzareno Filippini

M.Sc.    

Rete Ferroviaria Italiana S.p.A

Ronak Trivedi

B.Eng, M.Eng, M.Bus

Senior Project Engineer

Ansaldo STS Australia Pty Ltd

 

SUMMARY

The railways serving Australian capital cities are no different to many railways around the world that face the challenge of rapidly growing populations in their urban areas. Providing improved capacity on existing lines and building new lines to deliver increased services, reducing operating costs, and improving the customer experience all feature as goals for the railway’s over-arching objective of contributing to the creation of liveable cities.

The application of an innovative ETCS solution is one key strategy that is available to assist in achieving this objective by offering an opportunity to:

  • Minimize infrastructure upgrading by improving network capacity Trains Per Hour and Trains Paths Per Hour through implementing the latest ETCS baseline and smartest TMS, along with interoperable ATO over ETCS.
  • Provide dynamic updating of trips/journeys, improving customer experience by informing them in real time of any impact to their journey times.
  • Update key assets/infrastructure information by increasing the ability to respond to network disturbances/issues in a faster manner.
  • Drive the trains to the most efficient speed profiles, thereby reducing energy demands on the network and improving service capacity.

The application of ETCS Level 3 functionalities coupled with innovative solutions for train integrity management provide the key pillars of a High Density solution.

The Italian Railway has always been a pioneer in ETCS applications, starting with first ETCS Level 2 line in revenue service in 2005, and now with the current application of the High Density solution for busy areas like Milan Junction. By freely sharing the experience on ETCS projects from a major European operator like Italian Railway this paper envisages to provide valuable underpinning for similar ETCS projects foreseen in the very near future in Australia.



Size 6.86 MB
pdf.png 2018 - November - Palazzi - ADVANCED SIGNALLING ON OUR NATIONAL FREIGHT NETWORK: AVOIDING A DIGITAL BREAK OF GAUGE NEW

Bill Palazzi

B.Eng (Elec) Hons 1

palazzirail

 

SUMMARY

A number of railways across Australia are now moving to adopt new network control systems in order to maximise the value (capacity, efficiency, safety) of their rail asset. An integrated and coherent approach to these new network control systems has the potential to provide many benefits to all sections of the industry, and to the economy. Conversely, a disjointed approach will have consequences that will last for many years, including higher costs and lower competitiveness for rail transport.

The paper considers:

  • The status of the industry today (breadth of managers, operators, signalling and safeworking systems)
  • Advanced signalling initiatives underway
  • How we can avoid a new break of gauge – a framework for decision making

Specifically, this paper outlines an approach to ensuring a coherent strategy across the national freight network. This strategy has been developed in conjunction with above and below rail businesses, to ensure that it addresses the business objectives for both.

The strategy set out a framework to guide future decisions: an acceptable National Network Control System outcome must be Safe, Effective, Upgradeable, Scalable, Harmonised and Interoperable.

Based on this framework, a number of essential steps have been identified to ensure an acceptable outcome assuming that currently announced initiatives proceed to their conclusion. Key amongst these is the development of an interoperability solution between ATMS and ETCS Level 2; this initiative has now been committed to by Transport for NSW as part of its Digital Systems program, and will be pursued in conjunction with ARTC. A successful outcome from this work will be a significant step to achieve the overall objective – a coherent national strategy for network control systems, which avoids creating a digital break of gauge.



Size 1.02 MB
pdf.png 2018 - November - Page/Stamn - Automating ETCS for Enhanced Capacity and Performance NEW

Charles Page
BSc. MBA FIRSE
Head of Business Development & Strategy, Siemens Mobility, Australia

Bernhard Stamm
BSc. MBA FIRSE
Senior Expert for ERTMS, Siemens Mobility, Switzerland

 

SUMMARY
The renewal and expansion of metropolitan rail networks frequently includes the objective of safely increasing capacity in an environment of constrained physical infrastructure and complex movements of other traffic.


With the availability of high capacity and flexible mainline train control solutions, such as the European Train Control System (ETCS) Level 2, attention has moved to the addition of advanced features to deliver further increases in capacity and efficiency. This includes Automatic Train Operation (ATO), combined with enhanced forms of dynamic scheduling and traffic management. This involves both technical and operational innovation but also creates opportunities for more efficient and reliable services



Size 984 KB
pdf.png 2018 - November - Lemon/Smith/Talbot/Heibel - BEYOND THE NEW TRANSFORMATIONAL FRONTIER: DIGITAL SYSTEMS TO ENABLE ‘MORE TRAINS, MORE SERVICES’ IN SYDNEY NEW

 

Stephen Lemon

MSc CPEng FIRSE MIEAust

Transport for NSW

Mark Smith

FIEAust CPEng EngExec NER APEC Engineer IntPE(Aus)

Transport for NSW

Warwick Talbot

MIRSE GAICD MCITL MPMI

Sydney Trains

Dr Frank Heibel

PhD MSc(Hon) MIEAust FIRSE CPEng NER RPEQ

Transport for NSW / Doc Frank Rail Services


SUMMARY
Transport for NSW’s (TfNSW) Digital Systems program will transform Sydney’s rail network using world class technology to create high capacity turn up and go services to meet growing demand. The Program will replace legacy signalling and train controls with modern, internationally proven, intelligent systems based around European Train Control System (ETCS) Level 2 technology.
Digital Systems contains three main elements:

  • Replacing trackside signalling equipment with the latest ETCS Level 2 technology
  • Implementing Automatic Train Operation (ATO), which will be used to assist drivers – who will still remain in control – and provide faster and more consistent journey times
  • Introducing a Traffic Management System (TMS) for more effective incident management and service
    regulation across the network.

These elements will deliver significant customer, performance, cost and safety benefits. The modern technology will
allow for data driven operations such as dynamic timetabling, and lead to reduced maintenance possessions and
increased passenger and freight capacity.


An equally significant component of the program is the organisational transformation required to realise the benefits of the new technology, specifically for the resident operators and maintainers - Sydney Trains and NSW TrainLink.
This paper provides an overview of this major signalling technology and change program including the latest
developments, delivery considerations and tactics aimed to maximise the potential for successful program delivery.



Size 1.11 MB
pdf.png 2018 - November - Burton - Optimising ETCS for Busy Suburban Railways NEW

Noel Burton

BSc. (Hons), MIRSE

Engineering Manager NZ, Siemens Mobility Pty Ltd

 
SUMMARY

The European Train Control System (ETCS) has now established itself globally as the train protection system of choice for many heavy rail networks.  This is largely due to its open standards and multi-vendor support. ETCS was rolled out across the Auckland suburban rail network a few years ago, with the sole aim of improving safety. Following the introduction of ETCS, the safe working ecosystem of rules, signalling principles and ETCS configuration have been reviewed and optimised. Changes have been made for scenarios where it was identified that operational improvements could be attained without compromising safety.

This paper shares descriptions of some of the ETCS related improvements that have been successfully commissioned in Auckland. It is hoped that the successes of these changes in Auckland encourages other ETCS ‘owners’ to develop ideas for other improvements as well.

Changes made in Auckland, that are discussed, include: changes to the Driver’s rulebook, defensive driving strategies, warner route principles, enforcement of speed restrictions and the interaction with level crossings for stopping trains at stations. The paper is intended to give a high level engineering based description of some of these solutions and the reasons behind them.



Size 2.89 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Whiteside/Moody/Helmus - Data Analytics for Rail Insights into the Digital Transformation [Presentation]

Christopher Whiteside and Heather Moody

Siemens Ltd

Dr. Rhena Helmus

Siemens AG

Rail-based systems are exposed to various operational demands brought about either by high mechanical loading or
external influences. At the same time, billions of passengers and freight goods rely on rail systems every day. Safety,
availability, and reliability are key for a competitive rail-based transport. To capture any abnormal behaviour during
operations, data is generated by various sources for a better understanding of interacting phenomena and to prevent
component failure in advance. In order to move forward to a smart infrastructure, insights gained by the analysis of
historical and real time data have to be turned into actions.



Size 1.6 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Whiteside/Moody/Helmus - Data Analytics for Rail Insights into the Digital Transformation

Christopher Whiteside and Heather Moody

Siemens Ltd

Dr. Rhena Helmus

Siemens AG

Rail-based systems are exposed to various operational demands brought about either by high mechanical loading or
external influences. At the same time, billions of passengers and freight goods rely on rail systems every day. Safety,
availability, and reliability are key for a competitive rail-based transport. To capture any abnormal behaviour during
operations, data is generated by various sources for a better understanding of interacting phenomena and to prevent
component failure in advance. In order to move forward to a smart infrastructure, insights gained by the analysis of
historical and real time data have to be turned into actions.



Size 218.31 KB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Tattersall - Opening Presentation

Evan Tattersall CEO

Melbourne Metro Rail Authority

Transforming Victiorias Rail Network - Presentation



Size 8.7 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Rispoli - The rise of satellite technology appeal for train control systems [Presentation]

Francesco Rispoli

Ansaldo STS, A Hitachi Group Company

After relatively long periods of operation, the rise of satellite technology and the importance of its great benefits have at
last been recognised as strategic advancements for the train control system business case especially when operations
are in rural and desert areas. The catalysts are a gained confidence in the reliability of satellite technologies and the
unprecedented plans to put into orbit new satellites during the coming years. Furthermore, after decades of steady
innovation in the telecom networks, 5G offers the ultimate solution with millisecond latencies and “network slicing”
capabilities to realize bespoke virtual networks. For these reasons satellite technologies and IP-based communications
are “game changer innovations” for the ERTMS. This paper aims to assess the satellite technology trends, the Ansaldo
STS projects that in Australia have set the world’s bench mark as the early adopter of satellite technology on heavy haul
lines, and the roadmap to exploit new satellite innovations after the positive field tests in Italy. This plan backed by RFI
(Italian Railways Infrastructure operator) aims to contribute to the certification process to implement by 2020 an ERTMS
innovative solution for regional networks based on virtualization of balises through satellite localization, an augmentation
network, and the upgrade of the communication system from GSM-R to a public telecommunications network.



Size 2.58 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Rispoli - The rise of satellite technology appeal for train control systems

Francesco Rispoli

Ansaldo STS, A Hitachi Group Company

After relatively long periods of operation, the rise of satellite technology and the importance of its great benefits have at
last been recognised as strategic advancements for the train control system business case especially when operations
are in rural and desert areas. The catalysts are a gained confidence in the reliability of satellite technologies and the
unprecedented plans to put into orbit new satellites during the coming years. Furthermore, after decades of steady
innovation in the telecom networks, 5G offers the ultimate solution with millisecond latencies and “network slicing”
capabilities to realize bespoke virtual networks. For these reasons satellite technologies and IP-based communications
are “game changer innovations” for the ERTMS. This paper aims to assess the satellite technology trends, the Ansaldo
STS projects that in Australia have set the world’s bench mark as the early adopter of satellite technology on heavy haul
lines, and the roadmap to exploit new satellite innovations after the positive field tests in Italy. This plan backed by RFI
(Italian Railways Infrastructure operator) aims to contribute to the certification process to implement by 2020 an ERTMS
innovative solution for regional networks based on virtualization of balises through satellite localization, an augmentation
network, and the upgrade of the communication system from GSM-R to a public telecommunications network.



Size 1.72 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Ness - MMRA Presentation

David Ness

MMRA Rail Systems Alliance Package Director

The Owners Persepective - details of the complexity of the project



Size 1.66 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Moore - Track Circuit Activation Issues for DMUs

Trevor Moore

Signals Standards Engineer, Australian Rail Track Corporation

The first track circuits were developed in the 1870s. These were used on US Railroads. Over the following years they
were used on railways around the world. There have been substantial developments in the engineering and technology
used in track circuits through to the present time. However, after one hundred and forty five years we are still having
problems with reliable operation of the track circuits in some applications.
This paper will examine the type of trains, track circuit configurations and infrastructure conditions that contribute to the
performance limitations of the track circuit. The paper will cover engineering solutions and recent testing to address the
reliable performance of the track circuits.
The issue is complicated and involves the signalling equipment, rollingstock and the track infrastructure. An
understanding of these issues will assist the signal engineer in addressing solutions for reliable operation.



Size 391.17 KB
pdf.png 2018 - March - McGrath - Redundancy vs Resilience: The hidden vulnerability of installing two of everything [Presentation]

Alex McGrath

Level Crossing Removal Authority (LXRA)

The field of resilience engineering explores the mismatch between a system-as-designed, and the actual system as it
operates in the real world, in the presence of shocks, stresses and resource constraints. In signalling systems, the
modelling of component availabilities into system availability leads to the belief that more redundancy is always an asset;
while in a real operating railway, redundancy has at times been an asset to the system and at other times has increased
cost while also decreasing performance and whole-system safety margins.
This paper explores the justification for component and link redundancy in signalling system design alongside the
legislation and body of research on system resilience. It draws on a series of ideas from the field of resilience
engineering, and real-world rail and signalling examples, to explore the issues. Alarm architecture, lifecycle maintenance
planning, and criticality assessment are provided as concrete guidance for how to design a resilient signalling system.
However, true resilient behaviour depends on the context, organisational culture and human behaviours, and the real
railway as an evolving complex system.



Size 1.74 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - McGrath - Redundancy vs Resilience: The hidden vulnerability of installing two of everything

Alex McGrath

Level Crossing Removal Authority (LXRA)

The field of resilience engineering explores the mismatch between a system-as-designed, and the actual system as it
operates in the real world, in the presence of shocks, stresses and resource constraints. In signalling systems, the
modelling of component availabilities into system availability leads to the belief that more redundancy is always an asset;
while in a real operating railway, redundancy has at times been an asset to the system and at other times has increased
cost while also decreasing performance and whole-system safety margins.
This paper explores the justification for component and link redundancy in signalling system design alongside the
legislation and body of research on system resilience. It draws on a series of ideas from the field of resilience
engineering, and real-world rail and signalling examples, to explore the issues. Alarm architecture, lifecycle maintenance
planning, and criticality assessment are provided as concrete guidance for how to design a resilient signalling system.
However, true resilient behaviour depends on the context, organisational culture and human behaviours, and the real
railway as an evolving complex system.



Size 384.52 KB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Hunter/Joseph - Use of Independent Safety Assessment on Railway Projects [Presentation]

Hugh Hunter

Certifier Australia

Serge Joseph

French and Algerian Ministry of Transport

Regulation of Australian Railways in standardised across Australia and is administered by the Office of the National Rail Safety Regulator (ONRSR).
The ONRSR Major Project Guidelines [21] states that ONRSR expects major projects to engage an Independent Safety Assessor who:
Is independent from the delivery organisations
Resources the project based on the scale and complexity of the task
Use Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) with an appropriate mix of competency, qualifications and relevant
experience for the project scope
State government organisations such as Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW) state in their Guide to Independent
Safety Assessment [17], that new or altered assets requiring “safety significant changes” should be subjected to
Independent Safety Assessment (InSA).
There is a general lack of understanding in the railway industry regarding areas such as:
What is Independent Safety Assessment, why is it performed and what is its role in a project
The types of independent assessments that are required to be performed for the fulfillment of different
regulations and standards. This includes the usage of multiple assessment types within a project.
Can any safety assurance body perform independent safety assessments or do these entities have to be
accredited to perform their various independent assessment types?
Who performs the accreditation of an ISA and how is this accreditation recognised in different states and
countries.
Where in the project lifecycle does the ISA become involved?
How much of a project does the ISA assess, and how does the ISA ensure that the InSA provides a suitable
focus on the areas of higher risk
How does the ISA work together with the project with regards to observation management and the generation
of ISA reports?
What does the ISA expect the project team to provide for assessment?
What are the tools and techniques utilised by an ISA
The usage of multiple ISAs in project and how an ISA can accept the results provided by other ISAs.
This paper addresses this lack of understanding, providing descriptions of the different independent assessment types,
detailing the role of the ISA, describing the InSA process, and describing the use of accreditation for an ISA and how this
accreditation is recognised throughout the world.



Size 1.21 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Hunter/Joseph - Use of Independent Safety Assessment on Railway Projects

Hugh Hunter

Certifier Australia

Serge Joseph

French and Algerian Ministry of Transport

Regulation of Australian Railways in standardised across Australia and is administered by the Office of the National Rail Safety Regulator (ONRSR).
The ONRSR Major Project Guidelines [21] states that ONRSR expects major projects to engage an Independent Safety Assessor who:
Is independent from the delivery organisations
Resources the project based on the scale and complexity of the task
Use Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) with an appropriate mix of competency, qualifications and relevant
experience for the project scope
State government organisations such as Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW) state in their Guide to Independent
Safety Assessment [17], that new or altered assets requiring “safety significant changes” should be subjected to
Independent Safety Assessment (InSA).
There is a general lack of understanding in the railway industry regarding areas such as:
What is Independent Safety Assessment, why is it performed and what is its role in a project
The types of independent assessments that are required to be performed for the fulfillment of different
regulations and standards. This includes the usage of multiple assessment types within a project.
Can any safety assurance body perform independent safety assessments or do these entities have to be
accredited to perform their various independent assessment types?
Who performs the accreditation of an ISA and how is this accreditation recognised in different states and
countries.
Where in the project lifecycle does the ISA become involved?
How much of a project does the ISA assess, and how does the ISA ensure that the InSA provides a suitable
focus on the areas of higher risk
How does the ISA work together with the project with regards to observation management and the generation
of ISA reports?
What does the ISA expect the project team to provide for assessment?
What are the tools and techniques utilised by an ISA
The usage of multiple ISAs in project and how an ISA can accept the results provided by other ISAs.
This paper addresses this lack of understanding, providing descriptions of the different independent assessment types,
detailing the role of the ISA, describing the InSA process, and describing the use of accreditation for an ISA and how this
accreditation is recognised throughout the world.



Size 292.63 KB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Flinders - The Digital Point Machine {Presentation]

Richard Flinders

Siemens Ltd.

This is a paper exploring the concept of the digital
point machine, or more correctly the effects the
Digital Railway may have on the development of
and requirements for trackside equipment!
The move to a connected system for railway
control will certainly open up opportunities to also
connect the current ‘dumb’ devices but what will
the new scope for this connected equipment be?
Will changes be driven by digitalization or will
commercial and social changes have more
impact?
Will there be significant changes at all?



Size 846.39 KB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Flinders - The Digital Point Machine

Richard Flinders

Siemens Ltd.

This is a paper exploring the concept of the digital
point machine, or more correctly the effects the
Digital Railway may have on the development of
and requirements for trackside equipment!
The move to a connected system for railway
control will certainly open up opportunities to also
connect the current ‘dumb’ devices but what will
the new scope for this connected equipment be?
Will changes be driven by digitalization or will
commercial and social changes have more
impact?
Will there be significant changes at all?



Size 1.37 MB

Log in/Register

Please note that new passwords must include a capital letter and a numeral.

Join IRSE Australasia to get member prices and features.

Search this site