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pdf.png 2018 - March - Whiteside/Moody/Helmus - Data Analytics for Rail Insights into the Digital Transformation [Presentation]

Christopher Whiteside and Heather Moody

Siemens Ltd

Dr. Rhena Helmus

Siemens AG

Rail-based systems are exposed to various operational demands brought about either by high mechanical loading or
external influences. At the same time, billions of passengers and freight goods rely on rail systems every day. Safety,
availability, and reliability are key for a competitive rail-based transport. To capture any abnormal behaviour during
operations, data is generated by various sources for a better understanding of interacting phenomena and to prevent
component failure in advance. In order to move forward to a smart infrastructure, insights gained by the analysis of
historical and real time data have to be turned into actions.



Size 1.6 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Whiteside/Moody/Helmus - Data Analytics for Rail Insights into the Digital Transformation

Christopher Whiteside and Heather Moody

Siemens Ltd

Dr. Rhena Helmus

Siemens AG

Rail-based systems are exposed to various operational demands brought about either by high mechanical loading or
external influences. At the same time, billions of passengers and freight goods rely on rail systems every day. Safety,
availability, and reliability are key for a competitive rail-based transport. To capture any abnormal behaviour during
operations, data is generated by various sources for a better understanding of interacting phenomena and to prevent
component failure in advance. In order to move forward to a smart infrastructure, insights gained by the analysis of
historical and real time data have to be turned into actions.



Size 218.31 KB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Tattersall - Opening Presentation

Evan Tattersall CEO

Melbourne Metro Rail Authority

Transforming Victiorias Rail Network - Presentation



Size 8.7 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Rispoli - The rise of satellite technology appeal for train control systems [Presentation]

Francesco Rispoli

Ansaldo STS, A Hitachi Group Company

After relatively long periods of operation, the rise of satellite technology and the importance of its great benefits have at
last been recognised as strategic advancements for the train control system business case especially when operations
are in rural and desert areas. The catalysts are a gained confidence in the reliability of satellite technologies and the
unprecedented plans to put into orbit new satellites during the coming years. Furthermore, after decades of steady
innovation in the telecom networks, 5G offers the ultimate solution with millisecond latencies and “network slicing”
capabilities to realize bespoke virtual networks. For these reasons satellite technologies and IP-based communications
are “game changer innovations” for the ERTMS. This paper aims to assess the satellite technology trends, the Ansaldo
STS projects that in Australia have set the world’s bench mark as the early adopter of satellite technology on heavy haul
lines, and the roadmap to exploit new satellite innovations after the positive field tests in Italy. This plan backed by RFI
(Italian Railways Infrastructure operator) aims to contribute to the certification process to implement by 2020 an ERTMS
innovative solution for regional networks based on virtualization of balises through satellite localization, an augmentation
network, and the upgrade of the communication system from GSM-R to a public telecommunications network.



Size 2.58 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Rispoli - The rise of satellite technology appeal for train control systems

Francesco Rispoli

Ansaldo STS, A Hitachi Group Company

After relatively long periods of operation, the rise of satellite technology and the importance of its great benefits have at
last been recognised as strategic advancements for the train control system business case especially when operations
are in rural and desert areas. The catalysts are a gained confidence in the reliability of satellite technologies and the
unprecedented plans to put into orbit new satellites during the coming years. Furthermore, after decades of steady
innovation in the telecom networks, 5G offers the ultimate solution with millisecond latencies and “network slicing”
capabilities to realize bespoke virtual networks. For these reasons satellite technologies and IP-based communications
are “game changer innovations” for the ERTMS. This paper aims to assess the satellite technology trends, the Ansaldo
STS projects that in Australia have set the world’s bench mark as the early adopter of satellite technology on heavy haul
lines, and the roadmap to exploit new satellite innovations after the positive field tests in Italy. This plan backed by RFI
(Italian Railways Infrastructure operator) aims to contribute to the certification process to implement by 2020 an ERTMS
innovative solution for regional networks based on virtualization of balises through satellite localization, an augmentation
network, and the upgrade of the communication system from GSM-R to a public telecommunications network.



Size 1.72 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Ness - MMRA Presentation

David Ness

MMRA Rail Systems Alliance Package Director

The Owners Persepective - details of the complexity of the project



Size 1.66 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Moore - Track Circuit Activation Issues for DMUs

Trevor Moore

Signals Standards Engineer, Australian Rail Track Corporation

The first track circuits were developed in the 1870s. These were used on US Railroads. Over the following years they
were used on railways around the world. There have been substantial developments in the engineering and technology
used in track circuits through to the present time. However, after one hundred and forty five years we are still having
problems with reliable operation of the track circuits in some applications.
This paper will examine the type of trains, track circuit configurations and infrastructure conditions that contribute to the
performance limitations of the track circuit. The paper will cover engineering solutions and recent testing to address the
reliable performance of the track circuits.
The issue is complicated and involves the signalling equipment, rollingstock and the track infrastructure. An
understanding of these issues will assist the signal engineer in addressing solutions for reliable operation.



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pdf.png 2018 - March - McGrath - Redundancy vs Resilience: The hidden vulnerability of installing two of everything [Presentation]

Alex McGrath

Level Crossing Removal Authority (LXRA)

The field of resilience engineering explores the mismatch between a system-as-designed, and the actual system as it
operates in the real world, in the presence of shocks, stresses and resource constraints. In signalling systems, the
modelling of component availabilities into system availability leads to the belief that more redundancy is always an asset;
while in a real operating railway, redundancy has at times been an asset to the system and at other times has increased
cost while also decreasing performance and whole-system safety margins.
This paper explores the justification for component and link redundancy in signalling system design alongside the
legislation and body of research on system resilience. It draws on a series of ideas from the field of resilience
engineering, and real-world rail and signalling examples, to explore the issues. Alarm architecture, lifecycle maintenance
planning, and criticality assessment are provided as concrete guidance for how to design a resilient signalling system.
However, true resilient behaviour depends on the context, organisational culture and human behaviours, and the real
railway as an evolving complex system.



Size 1.74 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - McGrath - Redundancy vs Resilience: The hidden vulnerability of installing two of everything

Alex McGrath

Level Crossing Removal Authority (LXRA)

The field of resilience engineering explores the mismatch between a system-as-designed, and the actual system as it
operates in the real world, in the presence of shocks, stresses and resource constraints. In signalling systems, the
modelling of component availabilities into system availability leads to the belief that more redundancy is always an asset;
while in a real operating railway, redundancy has at times been an asset to the system and at other times has increased
cost while also decreasing performance and whole-system safety margins.
This paper explores the justification for component and link redundancy in signalling system design alongside the
legislation and body of research on system resilience. It draws on a series of ideas from the field of resilience
engineering, and real-world rail and signalling examples, to explore the issues. Alarm architecture, lifecycle maintenance
planning, and criticality assessment are provided as concrete guidance for how to design a resilient signalling system.
However, true resilient behaviour depends on the context, organisational culture and human behaviours, and the real
railway as an evolving complex system.



Size 384.52 KB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Hunter/Joseph - Use of Independent Safety Assessment on Railway Projects [Presentation]

Hugh Hunter

Certifier Australia

Serge Joseph

French and Algerian Ministry of Transport

Regulation of Australian Railways in standardised across Australia and is administered by the Office of the National Rail Safety Regulator (ONRSR).
The ONRSR Major Project Guidelines [21] states that ONRSR expects major projects to engage an Independent Safety Assessor who:
Is independent from the delivery organisations
Resources the project based on the scale and complexity of the task
Use Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) with an appropriate mix of competency, qualifications and relevant
experience for the project scope
State government organisations such as Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW) state in their Guide to Independent
Safety Assessment [17], that new or altered assets requiring “safety significant changes” should be subjected to
Independent Safety Assessment (InSA).
There is a general lack of understanding in the railway industry regarding areas such as:
What is Independent Safety Assessment, why is it performed and what is its role in a project
The types of independent assessments that are required to be performed for the fulfillment of different
regulations and standards. This includes the usage of multiple assessment types within a project.
Can any safety assurance body perform independent safety assessments or do these entities have to be
accredited to perform their various independent assessment types?
Who performs the accreditation of an ISA and how is this accreditation recognised in different states and
countries.
Where in the project lifecycle does the ISA become involved?
How much of a project does the ISA assess, and how does the ISA ensure that the InSA provides a suitable
focus on the areas of higher risk
How does the ISA work together with the project with regards to observation management and the generation
of ISA reports?
What does the ISA expect the project team to provide for assessment?
What are the tools and techniques utilised by an ISA
The usage of multiple ISAs in project and how an ISA can accept the results provided by other ISAs.
This paper addresses this lack of understanding, providing descriptions of the different independent assessment types,
detailing the role of the ISA, describing the InSA process, and describing the use of accreditation for an ISA and how this
accreditation is recognised throughout the world.



Size 1.21 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Hunter/Joseph - Use of Independent Safety Assessment on Railway Projects

Hugh Hunter

Certifier Australia

Serge Joseph

French and Algerian Ministry of Transport

Regulation of Australian Railways in standardised across Australia and is administered by the Office of the National Rail Safety Regulator (ONRSR).
The ONRSR Major Project Guidelines [21] states that ONRSR expects major projects to engage an Independent Safety Assessor who:
Is independent from the delivery organisations
Resources the project based on the scale and complexity of the task
Use Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) with an appropriate mix of competency, qualifications and relevant
experience for the project scope
State government organisations such as Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW) state in their Guide to Independent
Safety Assessment [17], that new or altered assets requiring “safety significant changes” should be subjected to
Independent Safety Assessment (InSA).
There is a general lack of understanding in the railway industry regarding areas such as:
What is Independent Safety Assessment, why is it performed and what is its role in a project
The types of independent assessments that are required to be performed for the fulfillment of different
regulations and standards. This includes the usage of multiple assessment types within a project.
Can any safety assurance body perform independent safety assessments or do these entities have to be
accredited to perform their various independent assessment types?
Who performs the accreditation of an ISA and how is this accreditation recognised in different states and
countries.
Where in the project lifecycle does the ISA become involved?
How much of a project does the ISA assess, and how does the ISA ensure that the InSA provides a suitable
focus on the areas of higher risk
How does the ISA work together with the project with regards to observation management and the generation
of ISA reports?
What does the ISA expect the project team to provide for assessment?
What are the tools and techniques utilised by an ISA
The usage of multiple ISAs in project and how an ISA can accept the results provided by other ISAs.
This paper addresses this lack of understanding, providing descriptions of the different independent assessment types,
detailing the role of the ISA, describing the InSA process, and describing the use of accreditation for an ISA and how this
accreditation is recognised throughout the world.



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pdf.png 2018 - March - Flinders - The Digital Point Machine {Presentation]

Richard Flinders

Siemens Ltd.

This is a paper exploring the concept of the digital
point machine, or more correctly the effects the
Digital Railway may have on the development of
and requirements for trackside equipment!
The move to a connected system for railway
control will certainly open up opportunities to also
connect the current ‘dumb’ devices but what will
the new scope for this connected equipment be?
Will changes be driven by digitalization or will
commercial and social changes have more
impact?
Will there be significant changes at all?



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pdf.png 2018 - March - Flinders - The Digital Point Machine

Richard Flinders

Siemens Ltd.

This is a paper exploring the concept of the digital
point machine, or more correctly the effects the
Digital Railway may have on the development of
and requirements for trackside equipment!
The move to a connected system for railway
control will certainly open up opportunities to also
connect the current ‘dumb’ devices but what will
the new scope for this connected equipment be?
Will changes be driven by digitalization or will
commercial and social changes have more
impact?
Will there be significant changes at all?



Size 1.37 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Detering - 70 Years of IRSE Australasia {Presentation]

Bob Detering FIRSE

Retired

A look at at IRSE Australasia over the last 70 years



Size 1.92 MB
pdf.png 2018 - March - Danton - Delhi Metro Line 7 [Presentation]

Julian Danton

Bombardier Transportation

Delhi Metro is a greenfield development of a 58km heavy metro system with 38 stations and 2 depots, for
which Bombardier Transportation are currently introducing a
CITYFLO 650 communications based train
control (CBTC) signalling and control system. The line is a mixture of above ground and tunnel areas,
leading to design consideration of system functionalities required to be able to handle operations in either
environment.
The vehicles on the line are designed to be operated in both UTO (Unattended Train Operation) and nonUTO modes, both above ground and tunnel. The CBTC system functionalities and integration with the
rolling stock have therefore been designed to be able to operate with or without a driver across the different
line environments.
The introduction of UTO requires a CBTC system with a higher degree of automation, including fully
automatic depot storage and dispatch, automatic jog and creep at platforms and automatic handling of
emergencies between platforms including evacuation. It also requires increased remote visibility and control
through the provision of remote access to onboard CCTV at the OCC (Operational Control Centre) and
stations to provide the ability to remotely handle onboard issues for a train in UTO.



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pdf.png 2018 - March - Danton - Delhi Metro Line 7

Julian Danton

Bombardier Transportation

Delhi Metro is a greenfield development of a 58km heavy metro system with 38 stations and 2 depots, for
which Bombardier Transportation are currently introducing a
CITYFLO 650 communications based train
control (CBTC) signalling and control system. The line is a mixture of above ground and tunnel areas,
leading to design consideration of system functionalities required to be able to handle operations in either
environment.
The vehicles on the line are designed to be operated in both UTO (Unattended Train Operation) and nonUTO modes, both above ground and tunnel. The CBTC system functionalities and integration with the
rolling stock have therefore been designed to be able to operate with or without a driver across the different
line environments.
The introduction of UTO requires a CBTC system with a higher degree of automation, including fully
automatic depot storage and dispatch, automatic jog and creep at platforms and automatic handling of
emergencies between platforms including evacuation. It also requires increased remote visibility and control
through the provision of remote access to onboard CCTV at the OCC (Operational Control Centre) and
stations to provide the ability to remotely handle onboard issues for a train in UTO.



Size 261.93 KB
pdf.png 2018 - July - Wang/Jiang/Zheng/Zhang - Intelligent Monitoring and Maintenance Scheme for Large Scale Railway Signaling System

Xiaomin Wang

Professor 

Southwest Jiaotong University

 Lei Jiang

Ph.D

Southwest Jiaotong University

 Qiming Zheng

Ph.D

Southwest Jiaotong University

 Wenfang Zhang

Associate professor

Southwest Jiaotong University

 

During the past ten years, progress with the Chinese high speed railway (HSR) network has achieved worldwide
recognition and acclaim. The overall operational mileage exceeded 20,000 km by the end of 2017. As for the railway
signaling system, it has been transformed into a large integrated automation system to keep trains safe. To ensure
signal system safety itself, many types of monitoring devices have been developed to monitor the operational conditions
of various items of signal equipment, and the massive amounts monitoring information generated individually are stored
in each subsystem respectively. These monitoring systems indeed improve the maintenance efficiency. However, due to
the isolated information of these monitoring systems, maintenance has even become more difficult for large-scale
complex signaling systems.
Based on big data, this paper proposed an integrated monitoring and comprehensive intelligent analysis scheme for the
signaling system. In the scheme, we show the overall logical framework, the cloud and big data-based data center, the
monitoring data mining and the intelligent analysis task. A case study of the intelligent monitoring and maintenance
system in Guang-Zhou railway bureau is presented. The proposed framework can improve the intelligence level of
maintenance and help to enhance the safe operation. The framework implemented in Guang-Zhou bureau shows the
effective data-driven maintenance approach.



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pdf.png 2018 - July - Sommerseth/Eknes/Hansen - Acoustic Train Detection

 Ørjan Sommerseth

Cand. Scient.

Wavetrain Systems AS

 Monika L. Eknes

PhD

Wavetrain Systems AS

Svein Hansen

Cand Polit

Wavetrain Systems AS 

SUMMARY
Wavetrain® Systems (Wavetrain) Level Crossing Warning System (LCWS) is a product based on acoustic train detection
that will issue reliable warnings about approaching trains at level crossings. It is installed with all components at the
crossing, without long cable runs, and it interfaces to the customer's preferred warning equipment, like barriers, lights or
audible devices. This gives the LCWS a cost of ownership advantage, including little or no service interruption during
installation.
The LCWS is certified end-to-end as a SIL 2 solution. SIL 2 is according to the ACRI
1 report an acceptable level for
identified low-cost warning system applications.
Acoustic train detection provides an innovative and practical solution for reducing risks at level crossings. The LCWS
provides reliability and excellent price/performance, making large risk reduction possible at sites that are too costly to
equip with conventional systems.


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pdf.png 2018 - July - Nardi - ATO over ETCS

Federico Nardi
BCompE (Hons), RE(OIGenova), RPEQ (Elec), MIRSE
Ansaldo STS Australia Pty Ltd

 

SUMMARY
This paper has the aim of describing the status of interoperable ATO over ETCS (AoE). AoE provides a set of non-safety
train operating functions related to speed control, accurate stopping, door opening and closing, and other functions
traditionally assigned to a driver. The safety of operation is ensured by ETCS. Enhancement of the time-table adherence
and optimization of energy consumption are two additional important features of AoE. Ansaldo STS, as a full member
of the UNISIG Consortium, is deeply involved in developing, maintaining and updating the ERTMS specifications in
close cooperation with ERA (system authority for ERTMS).

 



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pdf.png 2018 - July - Moore - Signal Design Verification – A Systems Engineering Approach

Trevor Moore
B Eng, MBA, Hon FIRSE, FIE Aust
Signals Standards Engineer, Australian Rail Track Corporation

 

SUMMARY
There are many signalling projects undertaken each year in Australasia. Each project involves the signalling design
being produced by a signalling designer or team of signalling designers. The objective is to produce a design that
achieves a set of requirements for the operating railway. There is the possibility of Human Error in the undertaking of
the design. There is a statutory requirement to ensure that the signalling design is safe So Far As Is Reasonably
Practical (SFAIRP).
To achieve the project requirements in a safe manner, a great majority of projects knowingly or not apply the V design
development cycle. As part of this development process a verification of the design is undertaken.
This paper examines why we undertake the design verification, how we undertake the design verification and the
outputs from the verification process. The paper also examines the scope of the verification process.
The design and verification activities are also reviewed in the context of the Systems Engineering Life Cycle.



Size 443.86 KB

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